Penn State Media Sales / Art/Architectural History

Art/Architectural History DVDs Offered by Penn State Media Sales

Architecture and Play: Learning From Children's Museums

Explores architectural considerations in the design of buildings for children by studying youth-oriented museum environments. Focuses on four key elements that embody the idea of play: multisensory issues, space-body relationships, juxtaposition of scales and spatial variety, and appeal to adults and children. Interviews architects, directors of children's museums, exhibit designers, and a child psychologist. Researched and written by Jawaid Haider, Penn State. Produced by Penn State Television / WPSX-TV.

Art Museums and the American Canvas – A Reply to the NEA – James Cuno

Video of James Cuno's presentation "Art Museums and the American Canvas-A Reply to the NEA." Cuno, Director of the Harvard Museums, spoke on this topic at Penn State on March 5, 1998.

The Traditional Art of Japanese Pottery

Visit a family of Japanese potters who work in traditional forms that are centuries old. The history of their style is explained, and the artists show the techniques that they employ. ©1993

Palettes: Decoration for the Booth of La Goulue

The beautiful la Goulue -- prostitute, cancan dancer, and queen of late-night Paris -- in 1895 asked her friend Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec to decorate her booth at the carnival of Trone. The result was two large, dazzling panels "Dance at the Moulin Rouge" and "The Moorish Dance," each of which put this provocative woman at its center.

Palettes: Japanese Bridges

For more than thirty years (1895-1926), French impressionist Claude Monet painted numerous canvases of a Japanese bridge over a lily pond in his Giverny garden, varying the perspective and catching the nuances of daylight on the bridge, the water, the leaves, and the flowers. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

The Pennsylvania Dance Theater: World Premieres

Program shows 4 modern dances performed by the PA Dance Theatre, World Premieres.

Legendary Lighthouses Series

LEGENDARY LIGHTHOUSES, a new six-part series about lighthouses and the remarkably beautiful places they're located, offers viewers the opportunity to rediscover the romance and history of these fabled structures. The one-hour programs visit remote locations such as Thomas Point Lighthouse in the Chesapeake Bay, the reefSally lights of Florida's southern coast, California's St. George's Reef Lighthouse, and the lighthouses of Washington's Puget Sound and San Juan Islands. Actor Richard Crenna narrates. The series also visits famous and historic locations such as Boston Lighthouse on Little Brewster Island, the oldest lighthouse location in America; Ocracoke Lighthouse, located in the harbor that was once home to the infamous pirate Blackbeard; and Rhode Island's Lime Rock Lighthouse, home to Ida Lewis, who became the most famous lighthouse keeper in America. Each episode, guided by storytellers who are connected to the lighthouses and their locations, covers one of the nation's great coastlines, with a sampling of lighthouses from that region. 6 hours on 3 videotapes. See also http://www.pbs.org/legendarylighthouses/

Legendary Lighthouses Series and Book

LEGENDARY LIGHTHOUSES, a new six-part series about lighthouses and the remarkably beautiful places they're located, offers viewers the opportunity to rediscover the romance and history of these fabled structures. The one-hour programs visit remote locations such as Thomas Point Lighthouse in the Chesapeake Bay, the reef lights of Florida's southern coast, California's St. George's Reef Lighthouse, and the lighthouses of Washington's Puget Sound and San Juan Islands. Actor Richard Crenna narrates. The series also visits famous and historic locations such as Boston Lighthouse on Little Brewster Island, the oldest lighthouse location in America; Ocracoke Lighthouse, located in the harbor that was once home to the infamous pirate Blackbeard; and Rhode Island's Lime Rock Lighthouse, home to Ida Lewis, who became the most famous lighthouse keeper in America. Each episode, guided by storytellers who are connected to the lighthouses and their locations, covers one of the nation's great coastlines, with a sampling of lighthouses from that region. 6 hours on 3 videotapes. Book: /Whether it's for their beauty, romance or usefulness - or a combination of all three-most of us would admit to a fascination with lighthouses. Paralleling the highly praised PBS travel documentary series Legendary Lighthouses, this companion book celebrates America's treasured coastal beacons and explores the nature of our love for them. Lavishly illustrated with color photographs, many of them taken during the filming of the television series, this book is a modern tribute not only to our rich lighthouse heritage but also the ideals and impulses that lighthouses continue to embody and inspire. See also http://www.pbs.org/legendarylighthouses/

Legendary Lighthouses: Lighthouses of the North Atlantic / Lighthouses of Maine

This program surveys the area where lighthouses began in America. The first lighthouses were built to foster the growing maritime economy of the colonies and preceded the birth of the nation by some 60 years. The episode explores the beauty and charm of Cape Cod and the Chesapeake Bay - areas with many notable lighthouses. / Maine has more than 60 lighthouses marking its rugged shoreline. West Quoddy Lighthouse, the easternmost lighthouse in the United States, marks the point where the sun first rises each day in this country. Cape Neddick Lighthouse, better known as "Nubble Light," and Portland Head Lighthouse are two of America's best known and most visited lighthouses. See also http://www.pbs.org/legendarylighthouses/

Legendary Lighthouses: Lighthouses of the South Atlantic / Lighthouses of the Great Lakes

Lighthouses in this area were often built to warn mariners away from the dangerous shoreline that stretches from the Outer Banks of North Carolina to the Lands End of Key West. These lighthouses stand as centerpieces of a varied and dynamic region, rich in characters, cultures and history. The program highlights the famous Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. / The shorelines of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan once included hundreds of lighthouses. This program features the lighthouses of the wild and remote Isle Royal National Park and those of the slightly more accessible Apostle Islands National Park. See also http://www.pbs.org/legendarylighthouses/

Legendary Lighthouses: Lighthouses of California / Legendary Lighthouses: Lighthouses of the Pacific Northwest

California lighthouses dot a coastline that is rugged, forbidding, beautiful, often fogbound and frequently deadly. Lighthouses on the western coast were built later in the nation's development, driven partly by the discovery of gold. This program features the lighthouses of San Francisco and Los Angeles, as well as more remote regions of the state, such as beautiful Big Sur. / This episode features the lighthouses of the beautiful and dangerous wilderness coast of Washington and Oregon. Building lighthouses here required extraordinary ingenuity, courage and strength - this is an area of huge waves, high winds, towering cliff faces, rolling sand dunes and pounding surf. See also http://www.pbs.org/legendarylighthouses/

Palettes: Krater of Heracles and Antaeus

In about 510 B.C., Euphronius, a celebrated Greek painter and potter who enjoyed experimenting with new forms and designs, designed an unusual red vase and decorated it with a depiction of the famous wrestling match between the mythological figures Heracles and Antaeus.

Palettes: "Liberty Leading the People"

Eugene Delacroix's bold, emotional, idealistic use of color defines the allegorical "Liberty Leading the People," a work that aroused passionate reactions when it was unveiled in 1831. The painting's bare-breasted woman crossing a barricade is the focus of this study.

Palettes: "Madonna, Child, and Saint Anne"

In a desolate landscape, the Virgin Mary attempts to restrain the Christ child, who is playing with a lamb as Saint Anne watches over both of them. The meaning of the painting has evoked questions ever since Leonardo da Vinci created it in 1510, but its message still remains a mystery.

Palettes: "Madonna with Chancellor Rolin"

The Flemish master, Jan van Eyck, is said to have invented oil painting and perfected it by putting paint on the panel in transparent layers, a technique that helped create works such as this "Madonna" in 1436. The landscape and gallery with figures is one of unusual depth, detail, and complexity.

Palettes: Public Gardens

Edouard Vuillard's 1894 conception of the Jardin des Tuileries spills over onto nine panels, offering a panorama of the middle class at leisure. Under the apparent simplicity -- women and children in a park -- lies a multitude of historic, technical, and artistic riddles. The program suggests that deciphering a work by Vuillard is a curious, never-ending adventure.

Palettes: "Seaport at Sunset"

Claude Lorrain's passions of land and light are reflected in his 1639 "Seaport at Sunset," depicting ships at anchor, receding buildings, strolling people, and a setting sun that bathes the entire painting in a golden-red aura. These elements are arranged theatrically to produce an illusion of intense depth.

Palettes: Self-Portraits

During his forty-year 17th-century career, Rembrandt painted nearly 100 self-portraits; even in his early works he positioned himself in the scene. Such single-mindedness, unique in the history of art, has been widely interpreted -- did this seeming extravagance have a secret meaning?

Palettes: "The Astronomer"

A mysterious painter, Johannes Vermeer fascinates by his meticulous method, the strange optical organization of his paintings, the repetition of elements and settings, and his enigmatic, dreamlike scenes. "The Astronomer," painted in 1668, is replete with unsolved riddles.

Palettes: "The Bedroom at Arles"

In October 1888, Vincent van Gogh, who had lived for eight months at Arles, painted his room. A year later, when he found himself shut up in the asylum of Saint-Paul de Mausole near Saint-Remy, he felt the need to make two copies of this painting he so loved. The work became famous in part because it has been reproduced in several graphic formats.

Palettes: "The Cheat with the Ace of Diamonds"

This perplexing painting of card players done by Georges de la Tour in 1635 requires a veritable police investigation to tie all the clues together and tell its story. Some say it is possible that the work has religious intentions, perhaps alluding to the parable of the prodigal son.

Palettes: "The Crucifixion"

Pablo Picasso's "The Crucifixion" (1930) seems an unusual subject because the artist was known for his indifference to religious themes. But within a classical presentation of Calvary, he placed a number of strange figures. The work, in an enigmatic composition, contains many allusions and also refers to a personal crisis in Picasso's life at this time.

Palettes: "The Feast in the House of Levi"

In 1573, Paolo Veronese depicted on a huge canvas a scene from the Gospel in a secular, earthy style and was summoned to the Court of the Inquisition, charged with disrespectful treatment of a Biblical subject. He argued, successfully, for the unfettered right of an artist to use imagination.

Palettes: "The Flagellation of Christ"

Piero della Francesca's painting is considered one of the most mysterious in the history of art. Although approximately thirty hypotheses have been formulated in attempts to explain its political meaning, "Flagellation," probably executed between 1450 and 1460, still remains an enigma. The work, bold in its restraint, is considered a manifesto of Renaissance thought.

Palettes: "The Lock"

This painting by Jean-Honore Fragonard, like much of his work, tells a story of sensual love. Each detail of "The Lock" (1775-1777) has a subtle meaning that reflects the traditions of pictorial science. This program also includes a discussion about how the Louvre authenticated the painting, which many critics contended was only a copy of the original.

Palettes: The Polyptych of San Francesco at Sansepolcro

Sassetta completed a double-sided altarpiece of wood in 1444 as commissioned by an Italian church, one side addressed to the congregation and the other to the monks. Today, twenty-six fragments of this narrative-art masterpiece are dispersed throughout ten museums worldwide and may never be reassembled.

Palettes: "The Skate"

In "The Skate," (1728) Jean-Simeon Chardin created something unique: a violent still life. Considered one of the most striking of all the Louvre's works, the Dutch-style painting depicts a monstrous-looking fish hanging on a hook, its stomach sliced open, and its bloody antagonist -- the knife -- partially hidden under a tablecloth.

Palettes: "The Turkish Bath"

Neoclassicist Jean-Dominique Ingres completed his last major painting in 1862, a portrait of twenty-five full-figured women relaxing in a Turkish bath, an exotic pretext for a sophisticated eroticism. This program contains footage of art works that depict nude subjects.

Palettes: "The Young Ones" and "The Old Ones"

In "The Young Ones," a pleasant-faced young woman stands reading a letter, her young female servant at her side; in "The Old Ones," a woman filled with regret sits peering into a mirror held by her decrepit domestic. Are Goya's two paintings (1808-1814) companion pieces? Or are they just distant relatives, with little in common but the gender of their characters?

Understanding African Art

Examples of sculpture, masks, and decorative arts illustrate this exploration of artistic expression in the context of African traditions. ©1998

Understanding Color and Light

Become familiar with the various properties of light and learn how and why we see color. ©2001

Understanding Impressionism

In the 19th Century, the movement known as "Impressionism" sent shock waves to every corner of the established art world. Learn about the men and women who revolutionized art by insisting upon creative freedom. They paved new avenues for artistic expression. ©2001

Art of Paris

Although Paris is home to many fabulous museums that are filled with artistic treasures beyond belief, the tourist discovers that art is literally everywhere in the beautiful City of Light. Things of beauty greet our eyes at every turn; and outdoor artists can be spotted at work, with their easels and paint brushes, in Paris's many delightful nooks and crannies. Bridges and the façades of buildings are works of art. Artistically designed fountains and wonderful statues are scattered throughout the French capital, on the sidewalks and in the parks. Art can even be enjoyed in the city's distinctive subway stations and cemeteries. Marvel at the art of Paris. . .it's a feast for the eyes! ©2002

Ancient Greek Art and Architecture

How Greek classical art developed from local traditions and from outside influences is examined. The orders of Greek temples are explained. ©1994

Arts and Crafts of Mexico

An indigenous artistic tradition thousands of years old has been merging with Spanish traditions for nearly 500 years. The results are stunning and unique. ©1992

Basic Watercolor Techniques

Learn about the various types of brushes and papers that are available to the watercolor artist. This video provides an easy-to-understand explanation of how to lay down background colors and demonstrates helpful drills for the beginner. ©1990

Watercolor Made Easy

3 VHS video tapes Master artist Robert Garden will demonstrate how easy it can be to learn the basic techniques used to create watercolors. ©1997

City of Refuge: A Success Story of Refugee Resettlement

Depicts the successful resettlement of Laotian refugees in Pella, Iowa, and examines the unique relationship between people of Southeast Asia and the United States. This award-winning program looks at one family's suffering as Laos falls to communism. The story reaches back to the origins of the Hmong people in Southeast Asia, with congressman Jim Leach of Iowa pointing out their unique relationship to the United States and their determination to start a new life. The family makes a successful transition to this very different Iowa community . . . playing, working and worshiping with the citizens of this city of immigrants. The family's determination to start a new life envelops this success story of the positive rewards of refugees and refugee sponsorship. Symbolic references to Pella, Iowa (founded by the Dutch immigrants in the 1800's) remind us how the United States is a nation of immigrants; thus, Pella's experience is relevant to us all. Audiences of City of refuge are inevitably provoked into thought and discussion.

Old Capitol: Restoration of a Landmark

This prize-winning program introduces viewers to the process of historical restoration along with a condensed history of Iowa as a Territory and a State. Graphics illustrate the founding of Iowa City and the initial construction phase in the 1840's. Old photographs show the rehabilitation and remodeling done in the 1920's and on-site filming traces the restoration process which started in 1970 and was completed in 1976. Shows the founding of The University of Iowa and introduces the people connected with Old Capitol from the founding fathers to the school children who contributed money earned in class projects for its restoration, the construction workers and many others who were instrumental in its restoration.

Rafael Ferrer

A profile of the artist Rafael Ferrer as he applies his lush, rhythmic visions of the tropics to a series of public installations in Philadelphia. Ferrer's work was most recently exhibited in 2005.

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